Do You Want Smart Kids or Kids With Good Teeth?

It seems that you may have to make a choice.  Water Technology Magazine released information today which publishes the results of a new study recently pre-published in Environmental Health Perspectives which strongly suggests that exposure to fluoride may lower children’s intelligence.  In this study, 512 children aged 8-13 years in two Chinese villages were studied and tested — Wamaio with an average of 2.47 mg/L water fluoride and Xinhuai averaging 0.36 mg/L….

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Nitrate Removal

Nitrates are often found in water supplies which are in areas where there is moderate to heavy use of fertilizers. Nitrates can cause Methemoglobinemia, which is also known as “Blue Baby Syndrome”. This is a serious condition occurring in infants and newborn animals, whereby the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood is reduced. The EPA has an excellent INFORMATION PAGE ON NITRATE.  The EPA has approved Ion Exchange and Reverse Osmosis as treatment…

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No-Salt Water Softeners

” What is your opinion of the “new” no-salt water softeners?  Is there real science behind their operation?” Here is The Water Doctor’s Response: First of all, there is no such thing as a “no-salt water softener.”  By definition, a water softener removes hard minerals (calcium and magnesium) and replaces them with soft minerals (sodium or potassium).   That is the only way to “soften” water.  The term “salt-free water softener” is…

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Chemical-Free Iron and Sulfur Removal

The buzz for iron and sulfur (rotten-egg odor) removal these days seems to be the word “chemical-free.”  However, let me remind you that things that sound too good to be true, usually are.  The newest way many water treatment companies are trying to remove iron is with the use of oxygen or air.  They simply use a water softener valve on a backwashing filter, and during the “brine” cycle, instead…

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R.I.P. – Merlin Tankless RO System

This is a classic case of over-hyping a new product by a large company. After millions of dollars of development costs GE was determined to recoup some of these expenses and went to market with a product known to have a high failure rate. After the Pentair merger, the product became a liability and Pentair was loathe to continue marketing a product prone to such high failure rates (we estimate up to 27% of the units fail within the first year.

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